Get Help Today

My Virtual Divorce, P.C.


Address

111 Deerwood Road, Suite 200
San Ramon, California 94583

Phone

1-888-511-0585
 

Custody

This week we are up to O which stands for orders. When you go to court, the Judge will make orders regarding the custody of your children, the payment of support, and the division of your property. Some of the orders will last forever. For instance, an order that directs you to sale the family home is an order that will not need to be modified. It will just be followed. Orders concerning custody or support however may need to be modified at a future time. This article focuses on ways to modify your court orders. Temporary Changes to the Custody...

We are up to the Letter M in our Divorce from A to Z series. This week's topic of discussion is Move Away Orders. Move Away Orders are custody orders issued by the court in the event that one of the parents decides to move far enough away that schedule would need to be changed. Move away orders are not made unless one of the parents actually plans to move. Before moving the kids, you need to notify the other side of the intent to move. If you have sole physical custody of the children, then the other side will have...

G is for Grandparents' Rights. If you are a grandparent of a grandchild whose parents are getting divorced, you may be wondering how the divorce will affect your relationship with your precious grandson or daughter. When their parents were together ,you probably saw the kids every holiday, but now that they are apart does that mean your holiday meals are going to become an alternating year affair? The short answer is as a Grandparent you have a limited right to have contact with your grandchild. And by limited, I mean you can expect a regular phone call and perhaps a few visits...

"Co-parenting" is supposed to mean shared parenting. But often times, the truth is that in order to be effective co-parenting means giving more to your child than you take in parenting assistance from your former partner. Because being a good co-parent means giving in, letting go, and accepting that there is more than one way to raise a child. Unfortunately, too often our pride and our hurt hearts get in the way of the sacrifices that we must make to co-parent our shared children. We forget that the child is a part of both of us, and we start saying "my...

When you are a co-parent, it is important to remember that you are not a single parent and you should truly share with your ex, so your children still feel they have both parents and two homes.  But not all co-parents understand this. Remember, in sharing custody, you should not think of yourself as a single parent, since you are not, though adopting this mentality is one of the hardest things you can do in co-parenting.  If you were a single parent, your home would be your children's only home and your rules your children's only rules. You would also not...

When you are going through a divorce or a custody action, there are a lot of terms that are thrown around in the courts that frankly mean something to the Judges and lawyers, but can mean very little to you the parent in your day to day parenting. You can joint legal and physical custody, joint legal and sole physical custody, sole legal and sole physical custody or sole legal and joint physical custody. Let's discuss the meaning of physical custody and provide you some practical understanding of how physical custody orders impact your day to day life. Physical custody is concerned with...

Parents in family court have to decide whether to seek joint or sole legal custody. Before making your choice, please read the following article for an explanation of the differences between sole and joint legal custody. Legal custody tells us who has legal rights and decision-making abilities over your child. The legal rights involved include: medical decisions, educational decisions, travel, and religious choices. Joint legal custody means that both parents can make decisions regarding medical treatment, education, travel, and religious practices. Joint custody imposes a duty to discuss options with the other parent whenever possible before making a decision regarding the child, but does not require that you and the...